Abandoned Car of the Week

After starting life as two-seat sports car in 1955, the Ford Thunderbird was turned it into a four-place "personal luxury car" for the 1958 model year. It was a sales success in the first years of its transformation. This rather beaten up 1959 model was discovered in retirement in a Texas field. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)


This second-generation (1965-1969) Chevrolet Corvair convertible was found sans a top in retirement off Route 66 in New Mexico. The rear engine Corvair was built from 1960-1969. In the first year of the second generation, Corvair sales hit 247,092, but steadily dropped off through the last year of production in 1969 when only 6,000 cars were built. (Photos by Jim Meachen)

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Nostalgia Highway

Mecum Auctions returns to Kansas City March 16-17


1940 Ford Deluxe Convertible

(February 23, 2018) WALWORTH, Wis. — Mecum Auctions is gearing up for its return to the Kansas City Convention Center this March 16-17 to continue one of the company’s longest-running annual auctions. Mecum Kansas City 2018 will mark the company’s 25th year of collector-car auctions in Kansas City, Mo., and the event is slated to present an estimated 700 American muscle cars, classics, Corvettes, Hot Rods, Resto Mods and more for auction.

1941 Buick Sedanette 'Dillinger' wins Custom d'Elegance award


1941 Buick Sedanette 'Dillinger'

(February 19, 2018) SACRAMENTO, Calif. — An extraordinary 1941 Buick Sedanette owned by Clifford Mattis and built by Antioch, Calif.-based Lucky 7 Customs was named as the recipient of the coveted “Custom d’Elegance” award at the 68th Annual O’Reilly Auto Parts Sacramento Autorama, in a presentation made during closing ceremonies at the Cal Expo Fairgrounds on Sunday.

Porsche Classic supplies classic parts from a 3D printer

(February 12, 2018) STUTTGART, Germany — "No longer available" — for collectors of rare classic cars, the unavailability of spare parts can quickly lead to problems. In the worst case scenario, the car may even be forced out of action. Porsche Classic, the division of Porsche dedicated to classic vehicles, has come up with a solution to this problem: namely, producing extremely rare parts that are only needed in small quantities using 3D printers.