Abandoned Misc

J.D. Adams & Company was founded in 1885 by Joseph D Adams who invented the first leaning-wheel pull grader. The company was based in Indianapolis. The leaning wheel, combined with an angled blade, increased the grader’s ability to excavate and move material in a specific direction. The grader could be pulled using a team of horses or by a motorized machine. This well-preserved example of an early 20th Century Adams grader was found in Hosmer, S.D. Above, a 1911 advertisement for Adams equipment. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


This late 1940s passenger bus was found in retirement on old Route 66 in Galena, Kan. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


These interesting International tow trucks from the 1950s were found on the lot of Troublemaker Film Studio in Austin, Texas. Apparently the 1950-era trucks were used as props in the film studio movies. The studio has  a very very cool collection of old trucks. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


McCORMICK-DEERING (circa 1940s) — The McCormick-Deering was a tractor built by the International Harvester Company from the mid-20s until the Deering name was dropped some time in 1948 or 1949 when the tractor became the McCormick. This tractor, probably from the '40s, was found in retirement in Hosmer, S.D., next to a vintage gas pump and travel trailer. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


McLAUGHLIN-BUICK — McLaughlin Automobile Company under the guidance of Sam McLaughlin formed a 15-year alliance with Buick under the direction of William Durant near the turn of the century. For the first few years cars produced by the alliance were known as McLaughlins. Then the name was changed to McLaughlin-Buick. Our photographer, Jerry Brown, discovered this circa 1914 McLaughlin-Buick in Canada. Notice that it sports very aggressive tires that probably weren't found on the car when it was new.


We like this unique display some enterprising home owner erected in their yard near Newton, Iowa. We call it a very good use of a neglected Model T Ford. (Photo by Jerry Brown)


This van was spotted buried in vegetation in the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state. We don't know if anyone checked to see what or whom was inside — other than more plant life. (Photo contributed by Susan Skaggs)


This abandoned bakery truck, which presumedly had a Ford Model T front end, made its last bread delivery decades ago and looks as if it is awaiting restoration. Photographer Jerry Brown discovered the ancient Anaconda Bakery delivery truck near Wales, Wis.


A 1955 Mercury sedan (left) and a 1951 Ford appear to be carrying on an abandoned car conversation in eastern North Carolina. Mercury shared much of its styling with the standard Lincoln in 1955. And for the first time, Ford featured an optional Ford-O-Matic 3-speed automatic transmission. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


Flying A gasoline became the primary brand of Tidewater Oil Company in 1936 and was used on the  East Coast through 1970 when it was permanently discontinued. Phillips Petroleum purchased Tidewater's western refining, distribution and retailing network in 1966 and dropped the brand name on the West Coast. The Flying A continued to be used on the East Coast until 1970 when it was discontinued by Getty Oil Company, which in 1966 merged with Tidewater. This remnant of days gone by was photographed near Bailey, N.C. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


Cars and trucks aren't the only "vehicles" abandoned to the ravages of rust and weather. This road grader of undetermined age was discovered along U.S. 301 in North Carolina, its days of service apparently over. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


A 1952 Cadillac and a mid-1980s Lincoln Continental share space in a yard littered with old motorized stuff in North Carolina. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


Three early 1960s Cadillacs, including one presumably ready to haul off a dilapidated travel trailer, reside near two 1950s era pickup trucks in this Arizona scene shot by automotive journalist Jim Prueter. A shame to see vintage American automotive history rusting away. 


A mid-1980s Ford F-150 pickup rests nose-to-nose with a late 1970s  Lincoln Continental. Both are in the process of being overrun by trees
and underbrush. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


This Leyland tractor appears in the early stages of abandonment. Leyland Tractors was created after the merger of British Motor Corp. and Leyland Motors to form British Leyland in 1968. Leyland built tractors through 1982 in Bathgate, Scotland, before the company was sold to Marshall, Sons & Co. Marshall continued to build tractors until 1992 when production was stopped. We have no idea as to the model year of this used-up Leyland example. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


A Texas farmyard in the San Antonio area sports at least two vintage and no longer used cars — a 1956 Chevrolet (left) and a 1960 Ford Thunderbird. The used-up tractor in the foreground has us stumped as to make and model. (Photo by Jeffrey Ross)


Research has discovered that this Danville, Va., bus, built by General Motors and belonging to the Danville Traction and Power Co., is of the same design and vintage as the famous segregated bus on which Rosa Parks was arrested on Dec. 1, 1955, when she refused to give up her seat in Montgomery, Ala. The Alabama bus was built in March 1948. Danville Traction and Power Co. was a public transportation system prior to the current Danville Transit System. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


This old bus has eluded the scrap yard by hiding in overgrown bushes and a couple of trees felled by storms over the years in eastern North Carolina. We were not able to determine the vintage of the destroyed people hauler — perhaps a school bus — but we do know it has come to an inglorious end. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


We think this rather imposing tow truck is a Mack from the mid-50s. Looking as if it was designed for heavy-duty hauling, it rests in retirement near Saratoga, N.C. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


A 1940-era sedan is covered in pine straw in a western North Carolina woods preventing us from determining the exact make and model. But it looks like the big sedan has become a permanent resident. (Photo by John Harper)


A lineup of worn out trucks in Tijeras, N.M. A circa 1946 International is on the right and a post-WW II Dodge on the left. Second from right appears to be a '37 International pickup. The truck with the white fenders, third from right, looks to be a 1947 Ford. (Photo by Jerry Brown)


A 1991 Dodge Daytona and a late-70s model Ford Pinto wagon appear ready for launch. They were discovered in this "blast off" position near Winchester, Tenn. The Daytona two-door hatchback was built from 1984 through 1993. The standard engine in 1991 was a 2.5-liter turbo four making 150 horsepower. The Pinto was built by Ford from 1971 through 1980 and included a two-door sedan, hatchback and wagon. Its peak sales year was 1974 when an astounding 544,209 were produced. Sales had fallen off to 185,054 in its last year in 1980. Only four-cylinder engines were offered and from 1975 through 1979 there were two choices, a 2.3-liter and a 2.8-liter. Horsepower ratings ranged from 82 to 102. Photo above: Ford advertisement for 1977 Pinto wagon. (Photos by Jim Meachen) 


Buy this hulk and they may throw in tires and doors. Found in Port Angeles, Wash. Best guess — a late '30s model two-door Chevrolet. (Photo by Jerry Brown)


Abandoned cars will probably feel right at home at this abandoned gas station on U.S. 301 in North Carolina. Gas stations and motels along 301 have been boarding up for two or three decades since the completion of Interstate 95 in the '70s. This Exxon station probably saw its last customer in the late '90s based on the $1.22 pump price for 87 octane regular. Exxon became Exxon-Mobile in November 1999. Before I95, U.S. 301 was the major north-south highway from Miami to New York. Happy Motoring! (Photos by Jim Meachen)


A late '40s model Chevrolet pickup (left) rests beside a post-World War II Dodge pickup in a North Carolina field. (Photo above and photos below by Jim Meachen)

Dodge hubcap and engine

1946 Dodge pickup dashboard left; when new, at right

Chevrolet pickup dashboard

The rear of the Chevy truck with the grille laying behind the cab


We think this is what's left of a late 1930s Chevrolet Suburban (Photo by Jim Meachen)


This dismembered 50s-era pickup sets next to the chassis of another truck in N.C. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


We could not come to a firm conclusion as to the nameplate of this two-door sedan of late 1930's vintage. But we did conclude that the hood resting on the car is from a 1948 Ford truck.
(Photos by Jim Meachen)


This old bus in North Carolina was at some point converted into a trailer, perhaps for transient workers. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


This old camper truck has probably seen its last camp ground. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


These old buses started life transporting school children, then they were converted to chruch buses — according to the name on the sides — before ending their active lives. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


A Metro van and an old school bus rest in an abandoned farm yard in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


A rusty hulk rests off Old Route 66 west of Kingman, Arizona. (Photo by Jerry Brown)


This old bus has found a home in an eastern North Carolina field. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


Someone in Montana tries to make a few bucks off his abandoned "fixer upper" in this photo by Paul Borden


A Metro van and an old school bus rest in an abandoned farm yard in eastern North Carolina. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


Remember when gas was a quarter a gallon?  Way back in 1919 gas was an expensive-for-the-time quarter a gallon. But even as late as 1960 gas could be found for under 30 cents and we think this gas station sign probably comes from the 1960s era. It was found in Georgia. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


Cars and trucks aren't the only "vehicles" abandoned to the ravages of rust and weather. This road grader of undetermined age was discovered along U.S. 301 in North Carolina, its days of service apparently over. (Photo by Jim Meachen)
 

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