Abandoned R-Z

WILLYS JEEP (circa late 1940s) — This post-World War II Willys Jeep station wagon was discovered along Route 66 at the Arizona-New Mexico border. The wagon was produced by Willys in the United States from 1946 to 1965 and production continued in Argentina until 1981. Four-wheel drive did not become an option on the wagon until 1949. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


RENAULT (early '60s) — The small French Renault Dauphine sedan sold more than 2 million units during its wordwide run from 1956 through 1967. The Dauphine measured 155 inches in length with a 89.3-inch wheelbase, came with a 51.6-cubic-inch rear-mounted four-cylinder engine with two versions, 27 and 36 horsepower. Zero to 60 time with the larger engine was measured at 30 seconds. Road and Track tested the bigger engine doing 0-to-68 in 32 seconds. Dauphine ads proclaimed 35-to-40 miles per gallon. This circa 1960s model was discovered along Route 66 in Carterville, Mo. At bottom, a magazine ad for an early 1960s Dauphine. (Photos by Jim Meachen and Ted Biederman)


RAMBLER AMERICAN (1964) — 1964 marked the beginning of the third generation Rambler American by American Motors. It was built through 1969 with five body styles including convertible, 2-door hardtop and coupe, 4-door sedan and 4-door station wagon. Three inline 6-cylinder engines (base engine 90 hp) and four V-8s were offered. Transmissions included 3 and 4-speed manuals and a 3-speed automatic. This Rambler convertible was found in Mayer, Ariz. (Photos by Jim Prueter)


WILLYS (1952) — This is a rare find — two stripped down 1952 Willys Aero coupes were discovered in east Texas by Peter Hubbard and published as part of his Junkyard Dog collection. In 1952, Willys re-entered the car market with a new compact car, the Willys Aero. At first available only as a two-door sedan, it came with either an L-head or F-head six-cylinder engine.  A four-door sedan and a two-door hardtop were added for 1953 along with taxi models.  The car's final model year was 1955.


SAAB (1971) — This 1971 Saab 96 wagon was discovered in Louisiana in what appears to be restorable condition. The standard 4-cylinder engine in the Saab 96 from 1967 to 1976 made 65 horsepower and was timed in an excruciating turtle-like 15 seconds from 0-to-60. The Saab 96 was built from 1960 through 1980 and underwent incremental changes and updates through the years. (Photo by Jim Prueter)


STUDEBAKER (Circa 1949-53) — This circa 1949-53 Studebaker pickup was discovered a few winters ago resting in a field of melting snow in Cortez, Col. It's in the 2R-Series family of Studebaker pickups. They were Studebaker's first pickups after World War II, a rather stylish truck compared to the more popular competition. Standard issue was a carryover inline six-cylinder engine with a three-speed manual transmission. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)




STUDEBAKER (1950) — There were critics who joked about Studebaker's post-World War II styling adventures, but the Studebakers of that era have stood the test of time from their rounded slopping rear end with wrap-around window to their "spinner" grille. This 1950 four-door, that featured suicide doors, watches as life goes by on a North Carolina highway. Above, a magazine advertisement for the 1950 Studebaker. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


This late 1960s or early 1970s Volkswagen Beetle was found enveloped in weeds near White Lake, N.C. The original Beetle was first sold in the U.S. in 1949 and sales continued into 1979 before the car was discontinued in North America. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


VOLKSWAGEN (circ 1975) — The Volkswagen bus was extremely popular in the United States in the late 60s and through the 1970s. The second-generation bus was built from 1967 through 1979 with gradual changes over the years. This circa 1975 bus was discovered in retirement — and in decent shape — in northern Vermont. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


A lineup of Toyotas from about nearly three decades ago resides in the Wisconsin snow, perhaps part of a new-new car lot that time left behind. (Photo by Jerry Brown)


STUDEBAKER (1965/1960) — Studebaker was on its last legs when these two 1965 sedans hit showrooms. About 20,000 Studebaker cars were sold in 1965, not enough to keep the struggling company afloat. The last sedan came off the assembly line in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, on March 16, 1966. The third member of this all-Studebaker lineup is a 1960 pickup truck. Also shown is an ad for the 1965 Studebaker Commander. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


VOLVO (1972-73) — This vintage 1972-73 Volvo 1800ES "coupe station wagon" appears abandoned but ready for action outfitted for summer fun in the middle of winter with a boat and tricycle secured to the top. This style of the sporty 1800 Volvo was produced for only two years reaching showrooms in 1971 as a 1972 model. The rear seat could be folded down to create a long, flat loading area. Only 8,700 copies of the ES1800 were built. (Photo by Jeffrey Ross)


STUDEBAKER (1941) — This Studebaker has seen much better days. The magazine ad above shows what the Studebacker might have looked like some 70 years ago. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


VOLKSWAGEN — This 1970s era Volkswagen Beetle was discovered living with an attractive growth of weeds in eastern North Carolina. The Beetle was enormously popular in the U.S. through more than three decades reaching 15 million sales in 1972 setting an all-time sales record surpassing the previous record holder, the Ford Model T. (Photo by Ralph Gable


STUDEBAKERS — These 1949-1953-era Studebaker pickups were discovered in retirement in Indiana. The 1949 model was the first all-new post-war pickup from Studebaker, introduced in May 1948. Little was changed over the five-model-year run with the exception of a horsepower boost in the six-cylinder engine from 85 to 102 in 1950. The truck came with a three-speed manual transmission and ahead-of-its-time doubled-walled cargo bed. (Photos by Jerry Brown)


STUDEBAKERS — Douglas A. Kerr captured this "Studebaker car lot" in Weatherford, Texas. Several Studebakers rest with other brands of vehicles. From left, a 1959 Studebaker pickup, a 1977 or 1978  International bus, a 1966 Ford F-100, a 1960 Studebaker Lark, a 1949 Buick, and a 1951 or 1952 Studebaker wrecker.


SUBARU (1986) — This third-generation circa 1986 Subaru GL wagon was found nearly obliterated by weeds. Like today, it was sold with full-time four-wheel drive. The 1.8-liter flat four was mated to either a four-speed automatic or a five-speed manual. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


VOLKSWAGEN — A sea of used-up Volkswagens in Moab, Utah. (Photos by Jerry Brown


VOLVO — This copy of either a 1974 or 1975 Volvo 164 was found in an eastern North Carolina farm field. The 164 is a 4-door, 6-cylinder sedan sold by the Swedish car maker from 1968 through 1975. It came with either a three-speed automatic or a four-speed manual transmission. There were 46,008 164s built before the car was superseded by the 264 for the 1976 model year. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


VOLVO — This mid-60s Volvo PV544 photographed in eastern North Carolina seems restorable. The PV544 was built from 1962 through 1966 with the B18 engine (note emblem on grille), a 1.8-liter straight four.  Most copies sold in the U.S. came with dual carburetors making 90 horsepower mated to a four-speed manual transmission. A November 1963 issue of Road & Track magazine clocked the Volvo from 0 to 60 in 14 seconds, fairly quick for the time. The quarter mile was recorded in 19.1 seconds at 70 mph with a top speed of 92 mph. Gas mileage for the 2,100-pound coupe was excellent, rated at between 25 and 29 mpg. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


VOLKSWAGEN — This 1970 era Volkswagen Beetle convertible is suffering from neglect. The popular Beetle was sold in the U.S. for three decades before production ended in the late '70s. It was revived with an all-new and modern rendition in 1999. (Photo by Ralph Gable)

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