Abandoned A-B

BUICK (1949) — The redesigned 1949 Buick was the first to use "VentiPorts" that became a trademark of the Buick brand. The top line Roadmaster received four ports while the remaining Buick lineup got three. The ports actually corresponded to the displacement of the straight-eight engine installed. This rustic Buick is on display at the Cow Canyon Trading Post in Bluff, Utah. (Photos by Jim Prueter)


AUDI (circa 1982-84) — The Audi 4000 was sold in the U.S. from 1980 through 1987 before it was replaced with the 80/90 series. It could be purchased through the years with either a 5-cylinder engine or a four-cylinder that grew from an initial 1.6-liter, then to a 1.7-liter and finally to a 1.8 liter. The 4000 was of compact size with a length of 176.6 inches and a wheelbase of 99.4 inches, about the same size as the current Audi A3. This 1982-84 model was spotted living by itself in a salvage field in N.C. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


BUICK (1963) — The 1963 Buick Skylark and Special was a "compact" car (193 inches long) sharing the same chassis, engines and basic sheet metal with the Pontiac Tempest and Oldsmobile F-85. Engine choices included a 3.2-liter V-6 and a 3.5-liter V-8. Transmission choices were a three on the tree manual, a four-speed floor-shifted manual and a two-speed "Dual Path Turbine Drive" automatic. This copy was found in a barn in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


BUICK (1954) — This 1954 Buick Roadmaster (notice the four-porthole design) has not only suffered the indignity of losing its grille and engine, but whoever was last into the car ingloriously left the hood gapping open. The Roadmaster was longer than other models and got a 200-horsepower V-8 engine. Above, a advertisement for the 1954 Roadmaster. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


BUICK (1956) — This neglected 1956 Buick appears to be in restorable condition. Buick sold 153,627 copies in '56 with two V8 engine options making 225 horsepower and 255 hp. Prices ranged from $2,416 to $3,704. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


BUICK (1964) — The Buick Skylark shared its underpinnings with the Oldsmobile F-85, Pontiac Tempest and Chevrolet Chevelle starting in 1964. The standard engine was a 225-cubic inch V-6. It was made in five body styles including a convertible. This rusted-out '64 Skylark is long past the point of no return. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


BUICK (1991) — The Buick Century name was first used by General Motors in 1936. A new Century came into the picture in 1973, and in 1982 the Century was built on a mid-sized platform. It got a facelift for 1989 and minor design changes in the following years. The last Century was built in 2005. This abandoned Buick residing next to an equally abandoned house in southeastern North Carolina appears to be a 1991 model. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


This1952 Buick two-door coupe, discovered in Wisconsin, sports a two-tone yellow and rust look. Buick was one of the most popular nameplates in 1952 with total U.S. production of 303,745 with the four-door Deluxe Sedan leading with 63,346 sold. (Photo by Jerry Brown)


BUICK (late 1930s) — Buick reworked and renamed its entire lineup for the 1936 model year to celebrate the engineering improvements and design advancements over the 1935 models. This is an example of a post-1935 Buick, late '30s model, which was found parked along the side of a highway in central Florida. Below, an advertisement for the 1938 Buick. (Photo by Jeffrey Ross)


BUICK (1970) — For the first time in several years, Buick offered an Estate Wagon on the B-body LeSabre platform in 1970. The only engine available was a Buick 7.5-liter V-8 making 360 horsepower mated to a three-speed automatic transmission. It was a heavy car by today's standards weighing in at about 5,000 pounds. This 1970 example seems to be in drivable and restorable condition. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


BUICK (1955) It appears that someone "abandoned" this restoration of what looks like a 1955 Buick in stripped down guise . Note it has four VentiPorts, which denotes either the larger V-8 engine or higher trim level.  (Photos by Ralph Gable)


AMC PACER (circa 1975) — Practical perhaps, but weird looking in our estimation, the AMC Pacer hit the market in 1975. It was designed, according to AMC, to offer the interior room and feel of a big car in a small-car package with its extraordinarily wide stance and enormous glass area. Despite good reviews from the automotive press, the Pacer never really caught on with the public and was discontinued in 1980. This abandoned early-model Pacer appears in restorable condition.  (Photos by Jim Meachen)


BUICK (1954) — The grille from this1954 Buick Roadmaster has probably been transplanted in another Buick. But this car seems still relatively intact despite the organ donation. The 1954 was an all-new model, significantly bigger than the model it replaced, growing nine inches in length and more than five inches in wheelbase. The standard Roadmaster engine was a 5.3-liter Nailhead V-8 mated to a two-speed Dynaflow automatic transmission. The1954 Roadmaster engine came in two horsepower variants,164 and 188. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


BUICK (1967) — This 1967 Buick LeSabre enjoys nice surroundings in its abandoned retirement. The LeSabre entered its third generation in 1965 and continued through 1970 with incremental styling updates. The '67 LeSabre received a slightly updated grille treatment. The first three generations of LeSabres were full-sized six-passenger body-on-frame cars. Engine options included four V-8s ranging in size from a 300-cubic-inch 4.9-liter to a 455-cubic-inch 7.5-liter. The standard transmission was a three-speed automatic. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


AMC (1968) — A 1968 AMC Ambassador SST trim line hardtop coupe rests comfortably in a field of eastern North Carolina weeds. It was one of the first mainstream cars in North America to get air conditioning as standard equipment. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


AUTOCAR — This huge Autocar Integral Sleeper Cab appears to be an early 1950s model.  Indentification supplied by a reader. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


BUICK (1953) — This Buick Special — notice the three fender portholes — was spotted in a southeastern North Carolina field. The Special was Buick's lowest priced model, below the mid-level Super and the top-of-the-line Roadmaster in 1953. General Motors renamed the Special the LeSabre for the 1959 model year. The 1953 Special was powered by the Fireball straight eight. The Special got the more powerful Nailhead V-8 in 1954. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


BUICK (1960) — This 1960 Buick has been put out to pasture in eastern North Carolina. (Photo by Jim Meachen)